Lessons for Nonprofits from the Annual University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt Edit Title

Small enterprises that use large organizations as business models may think that they are using organizational best practices.  However, in examining best practices for organizational impact it may actually be more beneficial to consider another organization that may be different in purpose but which is a similar size.  In order to learn what makes a small organization highly effective, we will consider an annual 4-day enterprise that commands an extraordinary level of commitment from its members.  This organization is relevant because the environments of nonprofits and the University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt are similar: both groups work with limited financial and material resources, high stress, and face what seem to be nearly insurmountable problems.  Furthermore, how Scav tasks are done relies on community organizing: someone who can’t buy an item will build it, learn it, or find someone can make it happen.  The factors that make teams effective can be transferred to nonprofits to leverage every dollar, hour, skill, and in-kind donation to have a similar exponential return on investment.  The ways in which Scav teams conduct recruitment, structure responsibilities, use resources, and get things done in cost-effective ways is worth paying attention to because their methods can benefit nonprofits doing community organizing.

Small enterprises that use large organizations as business models may think that they are using organizational best practices. However, in examining best practices for organizational impact it may actually be more beneficial to consider another organization that may be different in purpose but which is a similar size. In order to learn what makes a small organization highly effective, we will consider an annual 4-day enterprise that commands an extraordinary level of commitment from its members. This organization is relevant because the environments of nonprofits and the University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt are similar: both groups work with limited financial and material resources, high stress, and face what seem to be nearly insurmountable problems. Furthermore, how Scav tasks are done relies on community organizing: someone who can’t buy an item will build it, learn it, or find someone can make it happen. The factors that make teams effective can be transferred to nonprofits to leverage every dollar, hour, skill, and in-kind donation to have a similar exponential return on investment. The ways in which Scav teams conduct recruitment, structure responsibilities, use resources, and get things done in cost-effective ways is worth paying attention to because their methods can benefit nonprofits doing community organizing.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

The Sharing Entity offering such Paid Content hereby grants You a nonexclusive, personal, noncommercial, non-sublicenseable, non-transferable, limited right and license to view, use, display and adapt for your own personal use such Paid Content. All use of Shared Items shall require proper Sharing Entity attribution according to the applicable Content Detail Page.” (the “License”)

Edit Body Text

Attach docs, images, videos, and files by dragging & dropping here, or select files.

0 Comments
  1. No comments so far.
Reviewed by 0
No reviews. Be the first!
Liked by 4
Subscribed by 0
Collected into 0